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A huge pile of plastic bottle caps
Recycling & Kildwick
– the twins

This blog post was written by our intern Anna (16 years old), who did a student internship with us and learned a lot about sustainability and how to deal with our most important resources. The problem of plastic waste concerns all of us.

We´re living sustainability and ecological awareness!
That's why all our products are part of the recycling loop or even completely degradable! But what is recycling exactly? That's what this blog post is about. We also give easy-to-implement waste separation tips that make recycling easier!

What is recycling?

Recycling means that a waste product, or parts of it, can and will be reused.

Some parts of the waste can be reprocessed to produce secondary raw materials that can be marketed again. Secondary raw materials are the starting materials for new products. For example, new plastic can be obtained from discarded plastic by shredding and melting it. Or new paper can be made from paper waste again. By using less energy to recycle than to produce new raw materials, CO2 emissions can be saved, thus advancing climate protection.

Kildwick & Recycling:

All of our products are recyclable or made from recycled raw materials:

    diverter

    Urine container

    Toilet seats

    DIY toilet Kits

    Packaging

If you return the separation insert to us, this is free of charge and due to its polystyrene material it is fully recyclable. Our urine containers can also be fully recycled in Germany. Our toilet seats are made of bamboo, so just like our plywood kits, they are fully recyclable. Even in shipping, we don't use materials that don't meet our standards. So our boxes, packages and packaging materials are made of paper and cardboard.

Waste separation is very important

There are many treasures in piles of waste - things that can be reused. For example, raw materials (substances found in nature) and recyclable materials (used materials contained in waste that can be reused as raw materials). Recycling creates a cycle of raw and valuable materials. Waste separation is very important in this process. This means the separate collection of different types of waste. For example, in Germany we separate paper waste, glass waste, organic waste, plastics and residual waste. The blue, brown, yellow and black garbage cans make a decisive contribution to recycling. Our pre-sorting makes it much easier to recover the different recyclable materials from that waste. Without recycling, there would be a lot more garbage and that would be horrible for the environment. Waste avoidance, waste separation and waste material recycling, or the recovery of recyclable materials, are the elements that each of us can promote and thus contribute to an effective environmental protection in this area.

Germany is the world's recycling champion, but unfortunately most countries, where all waste ends up in a garbage can, have to do the same. In 1991, Germany invented the Green Dot, the first system that recovers new raw materials from used packaging. German household waste is recycled at a rate of 65 percent. Poor Asian countries in particular, such as Indonesia and the Philippines, hardly recycle any of their waste at all. But rich countries, such as New Zealand, Israel and the USA, also recycle their waste only very rarely or not at all.

But you can do something too:

only  throw away clean packaging before putting it in the yellow bag or glass trash. Only clean waste is recycled, the rest is incinerated.

Separate your household waste carefully:

Yellow bag

Do:

    Yogurt cups

    Aluminum lids

    Medication packaging

    Plastic packaging

    Cans

    Tetra-Paks

    Lids of screw-top jars

Don't:

    Ceramics

    CDs

    Disposable razors

    Tableware

    Toys

Organic waste:

Thurs:

    Peels of citrus fruits

    Egg shells

    Potato peels

    Fruit and vegetable peels and scraps

    Tea bags without clips

    Filter bags

    Arbors, flowers, grass & plants

Don'ts:

    Meat, fish

    Cheese

    Eggs

    Animal litter

    Organic garbage bags

    Ash

Paper waste:

Thurs:

    Newspapers

    Magazines

    Envelopes (also with windows)

    Paper bags

    Cardboard boxes

    Books

Don't:

    Tetra Paks

    Wallpaper

    Photos

    dirty paper

Residual waste:

Thurs:

    Sweep

    bones, meat, fish & cheese

    Eggs

    Coated paper

    Toothbrushes

    Diapers

    Ash

    Animal litter

    Vacuum cleaner bags

    Used paper tissues

    Broken glass & ceramics

Don't:

    Hazardous waste

    Bulky waste

    Batteries

    Medication

    Electrical appliances

    Everything that can go in the other garbage cans

According to a study by the Federal Statistical Office, every German citizen produces around 220 kilograms of waste every year. In total, that's over 18.1 million tons of residual waste, bulky waste and paper waste produced in Germany. For a family of 4, that's 880 kilograms of waste annually.

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This blog post was written by our intern Anna (16 years old), who did a student internship with us and learned a lot about sustainability and how to deal with our most important resources. The problem of plastic waste concerns all of us.

We´re living sustainability and ecological awareness!
That's why all our products are part of the recycling loop or even completely degradable! But what is recycling exactly? That's what this blog post is about. We also give easy-to-implement waste separation tips that make recycling easier!

What is recycling?

Recycling means that a waste product, or parts of it, can and will be reused.

Some parts of the waste can be reprocessed to produce secondary raw materials that can be marketed again. Secondary raw materials are the starting materials for new products. For example, new plastic can be obtained from discarded plastic by shredding and melting it. Or new paper can be made from paper waste again. By using less energy to recycle than to produce new raw materials, CO2 emissions can be saved, thus advancing climate protection.

Kildwick & Recycling:

All of our products are recyclable or made from recycled raw materials:

    diverter

    Urine container

    Toilet seats

    DIY toilet Kits

    Packaging

If you return the separation insert to us, this is free of charge and due to its polystyrene material it is fully recyclable. Our urine containers can also be fully recycled in Germany. Our toilet seats are made of bamboo, so just like our plywood kits, they are fully recyclable. Even in shipping, we don't use materials that don't meet our standards. So our boxes, packages and packaging materials are made of paper and cardboard.

Waste separation is very important

There are many treasures in piles of waste - things that can be reused. For example, raw materials (substances found in nature) and recyclable materials (used materials contained in waste that can be reused as raw materials). Recycling creates a cycle of raw and valuable materials. Waste separation is very important in this process. This means the separate collection of different types of waste. For example, in Germany we separate paper waste, glass waste, organic waste, plastics and residual waste. The blue, brown, yellow and black garbage cans make a decisive contribution to recycling. Our pre-sorting makes it much easier to recover the different recyclable materials from that waste. Without recycling, there would be a lot more garbage and that would be horrible for the environment. Waste avoidance, waste separation and waste material recycling, or the recovery of recyclable materials, are the elements that each of us can promote and thus contribute to an effective environmental protection in this area.

Germany is the world's recycling champion, but unfortunately most countries, where all waste ends up in a garbage can, have to do the same. In 1991, Germany invented the Green Dot, the first system that recovers new raw materials from used packaging. German household waste is recycled at a rate of 65 percent. Poor Asian countries in particular, such as Indonesia and the Philippines, hardly recycle any of their waste at all. But rich countries, such as New Zealand, Israel and the USA, also recycle their waste only very rarely or not at all.

But you can do something too:

only  throw away clean packaging before putting it in the yellow bag or glass trash. Only clean waste is recycled, the rest is incinerated.

Separate your household waste carefully:

Yellow bag

Do:

    Yogurt cups

    Aluminum lids

    Medication packaging

    Plastic packaging

    Cans

    Tetra-Paks

    Lids of screw-top jars

Don't:

    Ceramics

    CDs

    Disposable razors

    Tableware

    Toys

Organic waste:

Thurs:

    Peels of citrus fruits

    Egg shells

    Potato peels

    Fruit and vegetable peels and scraps

    Tea bags without clips

    Filter bags

    Arbors, flowers, grass & plants

Don'ts:

    Meat, fish

    Cheese

    Eggs

    Animal litter

    Organic garbage bags

    Ash

Paper waste:

Thurs:

    Newspapers

    Magazines

    Envelopes (also with windows)

    Paper bags

    Cardboard boxes

    Books

Don't:

    Tetra Paks

    Wallpaper

    Photos

    dirty paper

Residual waste:

Thurs:

    Sweep

    bones, meat, fish & cheese

    Eggs

    Coated paper

    Toothbrushes

    Diapers

    Ash

    Animal litter

    Vacuum cleaner bags

    Used paper tissues

    Broken glass & ceramics

Don't:

    Hazardous waste

    Bulky waste

    Batteries

    Medication

    Electrical appliances

    Everything that can go in the other garbage cans

According to a study by the Federal Statistical Office, every German citizen produces around 220 kilograms of waste every year. In total, that's over 18.1 million tons of residual waste, bulky waste and paper waste produced in Germany. For a family of 4, that's 880 kilograms of waste annually.